Category Archives: Uncategorized

How to make gluten-free bread rise

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Gluten-Free Yeast Bread

This is the best way I have found to make gluten-free bread rise. Here is the PDF of the presentation or see pictures below for more details. Let me know if you can get it to work. Good luck!

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Equipment:

  • Oven preheated to 350 degrees
  • Medium Pot with lid
  • ~1.5-quart bread pan
  • Saran Wrap
  • Stovetop

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups Cold Water
  • 1/4 cups Corn Meal
  • 1 ¾ cup + 1 cup Gluten-Free Flour
  • 1/3 cup oil
  • 2 Eggs
  • 1 tsp Xanthan Gum (if not in flour already… doesn’t hurt if you add more)
  • 1/4 cup Sugar
  • ¾ tsp Salt
  • 1 Tbs Yeast

Instructions:

  • Put 2 Cups of Cold Water in a medium pot (it must have a lid!)
  • Add ¼ Cup Corn Meal
  • Add 1 ¾ Cups Gluten-Free Flour
  • Mix well with a whisk
  • The mixture will look like milk
  • Put the pot on the stove on medium heat
  • Use a rubber spatula or wooden spoon to scrape and mix while heating
  • Heating up the GF flour changes it somehow so that it can rise
  • Keep mixing on the heat until the mixture can stick together like sticky dough (~5 mins)
  • Do not leave on the stove without mixing or else it will burn!
  • Turn off and remove from heat
  • Immediately after removing the pot from heat add these ingredients to the pot
    • 2 eggs
    • 1/3 cup oil
    • 1/4 cup sugar
    • ¾ tsp salt
    • 1 tsp xanthan gum (if the flour doesn’t have it)
  • Mix well until pudding texture
  • The dough should be cool enough (~100°) to add 1 Tablespoon of yeast
  • Cover the pot with a lid and let rise (30 mins)
  • Add 1 more cup of gluten-free flour
  • Mix until flour is incorporated into the dough
  • Transfer dough to bread pan (~1.5 quarts) and cover with saran wrap
  • Let rise a second time (30 to 45 mins)
  • Take off saran wrap and bake at 350 degrees for 27 mins

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Living with Multiple Autoimmune Disorders

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I’m working on the “Define your Dash” challenge from FamilySearch.org  The challenge is writing 52 post/stories in 2017 that defines who I am. This year I plan to blog about my regulars: Temple Pictures, Kids, Family, Parenting and Photography.

In addition, I’m going to blog about something that I don’t try to focus on in my life but since I’m “defining my dash”… it’s just part of who I am! Ever since I was a toddler, I’ve been diagnosed with multiple autoimmune disorders.

I have friends who live with terminal illnesses such as cancer. Others live with diseases like CF which require extensive medical care. Then even other people with mental disorders that are silently endured. Friends with birth defects, special needs, heart problems… the list goes on…

Autoimmune disorders fall in it’s own category… a category which I feel like even after extensive personal research is still very much unknown and undefined. It’s about having good days and bad days. It’s about learning how to live with symptoms with an unknown cause! It’s about searching without finding solutions. It’s about going to the doctor and saying “I have all these problems… please fix me…” but all they do is send me home with more pain medications or take out another organ which is causing pain!! Please don’t take out any more of my organs!! 🙂

My hopes about writing about my autoimmune disorders is not to complain but instead to share what I’ve experience in hopes to connect with others who may have the same problems. I want to share how I cope with these illnesses and also the blessings I see from having autoimmune disorders! ❤

These are the autoimmune/immune disorders I have been officially diagnosed:

  • Eczema
  • Psoriasis
  • Grave’s Disease (Hyper Thyroid)
  • Still’s Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Drug induced Lupus
  • Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria (Chronic Hives)
  • Allergies to cats, pollens, trees and grass (Ranked 5 on allergy tests)
  • Chronic Gastritis in Stomach

Other annoyances and symptoms:

  • Asthma
  • Recurring Bronchitis
  • Recurring Strep
  • Recurring Ear Infections
  • Recurring UTIs
  • A hernia in my diaphragm which causes acid reflex
  • Unknown GI Problem – Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Gallbladder?
  • Hypo Thyroid due to radioactive iodine treatment to kill thyroid gland
  • Pain in upper right quadrant of abdominal/back – Kidney? Gallbladder? Arthritis in Ribs?
  • Daily Headaches @ ~1-2 pm – Tension Headache? Migraine? Arthritis in neck?

Well… that’s all I can think about for now… I might add a few more symptoms later… I will try to write about a few of these disorders this year! I know I don’t always see it this way but it really has been a blessing God has given me to deal with these problems. I have a awesome hubby in medical school so it really helps to ask him lots of questions! I also know how to look up scientifically sound research on the internet which is a great skill to have because there is a lot of junk out there. I want to go about this in a very positive way and share what I’ve learned with you.

Now my question is: Do you experience any of these symptoms?!!? Or have an autoimmune or immune disorder?

 

 

 

 

5 Tips to Stay Awake During General Conference

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Christ waking up his sleeping apostles. Picture Source: http://www.lds.org

I’m just being completely honest. I love General Conference so much but it is a lot different with little kids. My husband and I try so hard to pay attention but our kids are so distracting. To make things worst, Sunday afternoon session of General Conference is one of the hardest to stay awake. It’s the last session and it’s during nap time.

  1. Stand Up – If you start feeling sleepy, don’t lay down on the couch! Stand up. 🙂
  2. Ask Questions and Seek for Answers  – This is one of the best ways to learn from the Holy Ghost. Have life questions written down before the session and seek for answers from the sermons.”Ask, and ye shall receive; knock, and it shall be opened unto you; for he that asketh, receiveth; and unto him that knocketh, it shall be opened.” -3 Nephi 27:29
  3. Healthy Snacks – After snacking on Muddy Buddies all morning, I think I need to find something more healthy so I can have more energy. Here are some healthy snack ideas from the Time Out for Women LDS Blog.
  4. Play a Game – Play an appropriate game with your family like General Conference Bingo or find other ideas online.
  5. Share Goodness – If it’s not too distracting, I like talking to my kids about what the speakers are saying and helping them understand in 2 and 4 year old terms. I also like to share with my husband thoughts and impressions that I get throughout the meeting. I know some people like to Twitter their thoughts during conference. There is a very active #LDSconf Twitter community. I guess we all just need to find out what works for us.

How do you stay awake and alert while watching general conference?!

Grateful Thanksgiving List!

There are so many things I’m grateful for! Everyone has been posting their “gratefuls” on their Facebook and I’ve been reading them thinking that I need to be more grateful! Here’s a list… it’s written in no particular order:

There’s much much more… But lastly, I’m grateful for scheduling out blog post. No, I’m not writing this on Thanksgiving… I’m spending time with family! I hope you can be with special people too this Thanksgiving. If you’re alone this Thanksgiving, you can always chat with some Mormons online here.

What are you grateful for? Leave me a message and I’ll get back to you on Monday. 🙂

FormerTheist: The Adventure Begins

Wow what a cool conversion story.. I can’t wait to read more. Let’s all welcome him to our church! 🙂

Thoughts of a Former Theist

I remember going to church with my mother and sisters, but not often.  We were very much the C & E type of Christians.  Dad would never go though.  All I knew was that he didn’t like church – I never knew (still don’t) whether he believed or not, just that he didn’t want to go to church.  I knew that he had been raised Catholic and there was some resentment towards the RC church, ostensibly due to his family’s situation around the time of WWII and the church’s sanctioned attitude to how families should work being a major factor.  I have wondered, however, in my later years, if my father was ever a victim.  He had been an active churchgoer – singing in the choir etc. – before suddenly leaving. The idea that my father – a barrel-chested, outgoing, physically dominant man’s man – could have been abused at…

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